Dell will donate $14M this year to make sure kids are learning tech-savvy skills



Quinn Langford, a local high schooler and daughter of Dell employees, appears in a new promo for the company's Power of One mentorship campaign.

Without a highly educated and diverse workforce, Dell Inc. knows its won’t hold onto its status as a global technology leader.

The Round Rock-based corporation said Wednesday it will give more than $14 million this fiscal year to provide millions of children worldwide with access to technology and resources to explore science, technology, engineering and math. The so-called STEM fields are in high demand among tech employers, and some Austin executives worry not enough are being trained to supply the economy’s future needs.

Dell has donated more than $50 million to such initiatives since 2014, benefiting more than 4 million youngsters, according to the announcement.

Dell Inc. is a subsidiary of Dell Technologies Inc., which was created after its 2016 buyout of EMC Corp.

Dell has also rolled out a new mentorship program called Power of One: a day of Dell employee volunteering and speaking with children about their jobs, and it wants other technology companies to join in.

Dell donates to 71 nonprofits around the world, including Girls Who Code, which teaches computer skills to more than 40,000 girls in the U.S., and Camara Education, an Ireland-based charity that provides schools in Africa and nationwide with computers and support services.

“The power of mentorship is immeasurable,” Trisa Thompson, Dell chief responsibility officer, said in a statement. “Children especially need strong role models. We are excited to encourage the tech industry as a whole to embrace a culture of mentorship and to encourage a more diverse, and in turn successful, STEM workforce for tomorrow.”

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